March 9, 1832 – First Political Announcement
“Every man is said to have his peculiar ambition. Whether it be true or not, I can say for one that I have no other so great as that of being truly esteemed of my fellow men, by rendering myself worthy of their esteem. How far I shall succeed in gratifying this ambition, is yet to be developed.”
-March 9, 1832 – To the People of Sangamo County, Illinois, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 1:8 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

March 9, 1832 – First Political Announcement
“Upon the subject of education, not presuming to dictate any plan or system respecting it, I can only say that I view it as the most important subject which we as a people can be engaged in.”
-March 9, 1832 – To the People of Sangamo County, Illinois, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 1:8 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

December 26, 1839 – Speech on the Sub-Treasury in the Illinois House of Representatives
“The probability that we may fall in the struggle ought not to deter us from the support of a cause we believe to be just; it shall not deter me.”

July 31, 1846 – Handbill Replying to Charges of Infidelity
“That I am not a member of any Christian Church, is true; but I have never denied the truth of the Scriptures; and I have never spoken with intentional disrespect of religion in general, or any denomination of Christians in particular.”
-July 31, 1846– Handbill Replying to Charges of Infidelity, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 1:382 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

June 16, 1858 – House Divided Speech in Springfield, Illinois
“I believe this Government cannot endure, permanently half slave and half free.”
-July 10, 1858 – Speech at Chicago, IllinoisCollected Works of Abraham Lincoln 2:491 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

June 16, 1858 – House Divided Speech in Springfield, Illinois
“A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure permanently half-slave and half-free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved – I do not expect the house to fall – but I do expect it will cease to be divided.  It will become all one thing or all the other.”
-July 10, 1858 – Speech at Chicago, IllinoisCollected Works of Abraham Lincoln 2:491 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

July 10, 1858 – Speech at Chicago, Illinois
“I leave you, hoping that the lamp of liberty will burn in your bosoms until there shall no longer be a doubt that all men are created free and equal.”
-July 10, 1858 – Speech at Chicago, IllinoisCollected Works of Abraham Lincoln 2:502 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

August 21, 1858 – Lincoln-Douglas debate at Ottawa
“Public sentiment is everything. With public sentiment, nothing can fail; without it nothing can succeed.”
-August 21, 1858– First Debate with Stephen A. Douglas at Ottawa, Illinois, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 3:27 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

April 6, 1859 – Letter to Henry Pierce
“This is a world of compensations; and he who would be no slave, must consent to have no slave.”
-April 6, 1859– To Henry L. Pierce and Others, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 3:376 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

April 6, 1859 – Letter to Henry Pierce
“Those who deny freedom to others, deserve it not for themselves; and, under a just God, can not long retain it.”
-April 6, 1859– To Henry L. Pierce and Others, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 3:376 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

September 30, 1859 – Address before the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society
“Every blade of grass is a study; and to produce two, where there was but one, is both a profit and a pleasure.”
-September 30, 1859– Address before the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 3:480 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

September 30, 1859 – Address before the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society
“Every man is proud of what he does well; and no man is proud of what he does not do well. With the former, his heart is in his work; and he will do twice as much of it with less fatigue. The latter performs a little imperfectly, looks at it in disgust, turns from it, and imagines himself exceedingly tired. The little he has done, comes to nothing, for want of finishing.”
-September 30, 1859– Address before the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 3:475 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

December 20, 1859 – Autobiography
“Then came the Black-Hawk war; and I was elected a Captain of Volunteers — a success which gave me more pleasure than any I have had since.”
-December 20, 1859– To Jesse W. Fell, Enclosing Autobiography, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 3:512 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

February 27, 1860 – Cooper Union Address
“Let us have faith that right makes might, and in that faith, let us, to the end, dare to do our duty as we understand it.”
-February 27, 1860– Address at Cooper Institute, New York City, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 3:550 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

February 11, 1861 – Farewell Address at the Great Western Depot in Springfield, Illinois
“To His care commending you, as I hope in your prayers you will commend me, I bid you an affectionate farewell.”
-February 11, 1861– Farewell Address at Springfield, Illinois, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 4:190 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

February 21, 1861 – Address to the New Jersey General Assembly
“The man does not live who is more devoted to peace than I am. None who would do more to preserve it.”
-February 21, 1861– Address to the New Jersey General Assembly at Trenton, New Jersey, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 4:237 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

February 22, 1861 – Address in Independence Hall
“I have never had a feeling politically that did not spring from the sentiments embodied in the Declaration of Independence.”
-February 22, 1861– Speech in Independence Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 4:240 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

March 4, 1861 – Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address
“The mystic chords of memeory, stretching from every battle-field, and patriot grave, to every living heart and hearth-stone, all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union, when again touched, as surely they will be, by the better angels of our nature.”
-March 4, 1861– First Inaugural Address—Final Text, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 4:271 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

March 4, 1861 – Lincoln’s First Inaugural Address
“We are not enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection.”
-March 4, 1861– First Inaugural Address—Final Text, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 4:271 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

December 1, 1862 – Lincoln’s Second Annual Message to Congress
“In giving freedom to the slave, we assure freedom to the free — honorable alike in what we give, and what we preserve. We shall nobly save, or meanly lose, the last best, hope of earth.”
-December 1, 1862– Annual Message to Congress, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 5:537 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

August 26, 1863 – Letter to James Conkling
“You dislike the emancipation proclamation; and, perhaps, would have it retracted. You say it is unconstitutional — I think differently.”
-August 26, 1863– To James C. Conkling, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 6:408 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

August 26, 1863 – Letter to James Conkling
“Peace does not appear so distant as it did. I hope it will come soon, and come to stay; and so come as to be worth the keeping in all future time.”
-August 26, 1863– To James C. Conkling, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 6:410 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

November 19, 1863 – Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address
“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.”
-November 19, 1863– Address Delivered at the Dedication of the Cemetery at Gettysburg, first draft, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 7:17 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

November 19, 1863 – Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address
“Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure.”
-November 19, 1863– Address Delivered at the Dedication of the Cemetery at Gettysburg, first draft, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 7:17 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

November 19, 1863 – Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address
“…that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom; and that this government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.”
-November 19, 1863– Address Delivered at the Dedication of the Cemetery at Gettysburg, first draft, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 7:18 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

March 21, 1864 – Reply to New York Workingmen’s Democratic Republican Association
“Property is the fruit of labor…property is desirable…is a positive good in the world.”
-March 21, 1864– Reply to New York Workingmen’s Democratic Republican Association, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 7:259 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

June 9, 1864 – Reply to Delegation from the National Union League
“I have not permitted myself, gentlemen, to conclude that I am the best man in the country; but I am reminded, in this connection, of a story of an old Dutch farmer who remarked to a companion once that ‘it was not best to swap horses while crossing streams.”
-June 9, 1864– Reply to Delegation from the National Union League, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 7:384 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

August 22, 1864 – Speech to the One Hundred Sixty-sixth Ohio Regiment
“I am greatly obliged to you, and to all who have come forward at the call of their country.”
-August 18, 1864– Reply to Delegation from the National Union League, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 7:504 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

August 22, 1864 – Speech to the One Hundred Sixty-sixth Ohio Regiment
“I happen temporarily to occupy this big white house. I am living witness that any one of your children may look to come here as my father’s child has.”
-August 22, 1864– Speech to One Hundred Sixty-sixth Ohio Regiment, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 7 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

November 21, 1864 – Letter to Mrs. Lydia Bixby
“I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom.”
-November 21, 1864–To Mrs. Lydia Bixby, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 8:117 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

March 4, 1865 – Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address
“With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right, as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation’s wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow, and his orphan…”

March 17, 1865 – Speech to One Hundred Fortieth Indiana Regiment
“Whenever I hear any one arguing for slavery I feel a strong impulse to see it tried on him personally.”
-March 17, 1865– Speech to One Hundred Fortieth Indiana Regiment, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 8:361 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

September 30, 1859
“A capacity, and taste, for reading, gives access to whatever has already been discovered by others. It is the key, or one of the keys, to the already solved problems.”
-September 30, 1859– Address before the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln 3:480 (quoted with permission of the Abraham Lincoln Association).

February 12, 1809
This day in history: Abraham Lincoln was born on a farm just 3 miles south of Hodgenville, Kentucky.

October 5, 1818
This day in history: Abraham’s mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln, passed away from milk sickness.

August 1, 1831
This day in history: Abraham Lincoln casts his first vote at John Carmon’s house in New Salem, the voting place of Clary’s Grove Precinct which includes New Salem.

March 9, 1832
This day in history: Lincoln becomes a candidate for the legislature on a platform favoring improvement of navigation on the Sangamon River, changes in the usury laws, and universal education.

April 7, 1832
This day in history: Lincoln is elected a captain in the 31st Regiment, Illinois Militia.

August 6, 1832
This day in history: Lincoln, a candidate for the first time, is defeated in his bid for a seat in Illinois legislature. He is eighth in the field of thirteen candidates.

May 7, 1833
This day in history: President Jackson appoints Lincoln postmaster at New Salem. He serves until May 30, 1836, when the office is discontinued.

August 4, 1834
This day in history: Lincoln, in his second try for public office, is elected to the Illinois House of Representatives as a representative for Sangamon County.

December 1, 1834
This day in history:   Lincoln takes his seat in the fifty-five-member Illinois House of Representatives at Vandalia.

March 16, 1836
This day in history: Lincoln purchases from the Federal government a forty-seven-acre tract of land twelve miles northwest of New Salem on the Sangamon River.

March 24, 1836
This day in history: Lincoln takes the first of three steps towards obtaining the license to practice law when his name is entered on the Sangamon Circuit Court record as a person of good moral character.

August 1, 1836
This day in history: Lincoln is elected a second time to the Illinois legislature.

September 9, 1836
This day in history: Two justices of the Supreme Court give Lincoln a license to practice law in all courts of the State.

August 6, 1838
This day in history:  Lincoln is elected to the Illinois legislature for the third time.

September 23, 1839
This day in history: Lincoln begins the practice of law on the newly organized Eighth Judicial Circuit, which he continues until his nomination for presidency.

October 8, 1839
This day in history: Lincoln is named a presidential elector by the state Whig convention meeting in Springfield. He is also chosen in 1844, 1852, and 1856.

December 3, 1839
This day in history: Judge Nathaniel Pope admits Lincoln to the practice of law in United States Circuit Court.

August 3, 1840
This day in history: Lincoln is elected for the fourth time in Illinois legislature.

December 6, 1847
This day in history: Lincoln takes his seat in the Thirtieth Congress, the only one which he was a member.

March 7, 1849
This day in history: Lincoln is admitted to practice before U.S. Supreme Court.

August 21, 1849
This day in history: Lincoln declines offer to secretary of Oregon Territory.

May 29, 1856
This day in history: As a presidential elector for the fourth time, Lincoln delivers his famous “Lost Speech” at the organization of the Republican Party at Bloomington, Ill. he makes “over fifty speeches” during the campaign.

June 19, 1856
This day in history: The first Republican National Convention, meeting in Philadelphia, takes an informal ballot for vice-president and Lincoln receives 110 votes.

November 6, 1860
This day in history: Lincoln becomes the first Republican to be elected President of the United States, defeating the three other candidates, Douglas (Northern Democrat), John C. Breckinridge (Southern Democrat), and John Bell (Constitutional Unionist).

April 14, 1865
This day in history: Lincoln is shot by actor John Wilkes Booth in Ford’s Theatre.

April 15, 1865
This day in history: Abraham Lincoln dies at 7:22 a.m. in the home of William Petersen.